Religious policy in the Soviet Union



Publisher: Cambridge University Press in Cambridge [England], New York

Written in English
Cover of: Religious policy in the Soviet Union |
Published: Pages: 361 Downloads: 347
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Places:

  • Soviet Union,
  • Soviet Union.

Subjects:

  • Church and state -- Soviet Union,
  • Soviet Union -- Religion

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

My second book project, titled “The Crusade Against Godlessness: Religion, Communism, and the Cold War Order,” emerged from a puzzling disconnect between perception and reality: on the one hand, the foreign perception of Soviet religious affairs was that the Soviet state was committed to an aggressive atheist program, while inside the USSR. State Secularism and Lived Religion in Soviet Russia and Ukraine is a collection of essays written by a broad cross-section of scholars from around the world that explores the myriad forms religious expression and religious practice took in Soviet society in conjunction with the Soviet government's commitment to implementation of secularizing policies invariably shaped the.   Godless Utopia: how the Soviet Union launched its war against religion. The Bolsheviks delivered their first doses of religious policy by decree in the months after they seized power. Soviet language policy provides rich material for the study of the impact of policy on language use. Moreover, it offers a unique vantage point on the tie between language and culture.

book and reviewed drafts of all the chapters. Sandra W. Meditz RELIGIOUS GROUPS IN THE SOVIET UNION SOVIET-JAPANESERELATIONS THE SOVIET UNION AND . (shelved 8 times as soviet-union) avg rating — 2,, ratings — published Want to Read saving. The Soviet Union, officially the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR), was a federal socialist state in Northern Eurasia that existed from to and was the largest country in the world. Nominally a union of multiple national Soviet republics, in practice its government and economy were highly was a one-party state governed by the Communist Party, with Moscow as its Capital and largest city: Moscow, 55°45′N 37°37′E / . Christel Lane has written the first sociological study of religion in a communist and militantly atheist society. Christian Religion in the Soviet Union is the result of a detailed examination of Soviet sociological sources and the legally and illegally published reports of religious bodies or individuals, backed up by the observations of the author and of other Western visitors to the USSR.

To trace the story of religion in the Soviet Union, one must follow the footprints of the Russian Orthodox Church. It has been by far the most prominent religion in the land. That Church had its beginning in C.E. when Vladimir the Great of Kiev was baptized into the Eastern Orthodox branch of . The Soviet Union in World War II is the story of several wars. When World War II started, the Soviet Union was effectively an ally of Nazi Germany in a relatively conventional European interstate war. Although the Germans did most of the fighting in Poland, the Soviet Union occupied the eastern part.

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Church-state relations have undergone a number of changes during the seven decades of the existence of the Soviet Union. In the s the state was politically and financially weak and its edicts often ignored, but the s saw the beginning of an era of systematic anti-religious persecution.

There was some relaxation in the last decade of Stalin's rule, but under Khrushchev the pressure on. "The book deserves to be in college and university libraries and on the book shelves of all who are interested in Soviet dealings with religion." Paul Mojzes, Slavic Review " opens a new stage in the study of religion in the USSR, no longer as a subject of political science but of historical research.".

The Soviet Union was established by the Bolsheviks inin place of the Russian the time of the Revolution, the Russian Orthodox Church was deeply integrated into the autocratic state, enjoying official was a significant factor that contributed to the Bolshevik attitude to religion and the steps they took to control it.

Church-state relations have undergone a number of changes during the seven decades of the existence of the Soviet Union. In the s the state was politically and financially weak and its edicts often ignored, but the s saw the beginning of an era of systematic anti-religious persecution.

Get this from a library. Religious policy in the Soviet Union. [Sabrina P Ramet;] -- Church-state relations have undergone a number of changes during the seven decades of the existence of the Soviet Union.

In the s the state was politically and financially weak and its edicts. This book provides a sweeping and comprehensive analysis of the history of religion in the Soviet Union, tracing its fortunes through the chaos of the s, and the anti-religious persecution of Stalinism, to the slow strangulation of Brezhnev, and the liberalization under by:   Marx said religion was the opium of the people – and in the Soviet Union, atheism became government policy, enforced by the state and encouraged by anti-religious posters and magazines.

Ethnic and religious strife in former Soviet Union led to the Soviet policy of _____ which sought to spread the Russian Language and culture.

Russification Persuasion will not lead people to change the language they speak, but it can induce them to. Making use of newly-available archival material, this book provides the first systematic and accessible overview of church-state relations in the Soviet Union.

John Anderson Religious policy in the Soviet Union book the shaping of Soviet religious policy from the death of Stalin until the collapse of communism, and considers the problems in this area facing the newly-independent states of the former Soviet Union.

Religion in the Soviet Union provides access to the archival materials, translated by the editor, in which bureaucrats debated policy, issued orders, and struggled with Author: Felix Corley.

THE PLURALITY OF SOVIET RELIGIOUS “POLICY” By BARRY CHILDERS A Thesis submitted to the Department of History in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts Degree Awarded: Spring Semester, ii Barry Childers defended this thesis on April 6, Author: Barry Andrew Childers.

Church-state relations have undergone a number of changes during the seven decades of the existence of the Soviet Union. In the s the state was politically and financially weak and its edicts often ignored, but the s saw the beginning of an era of systematic anti-religious persecution/5(3).

Buy Religious Policy in Soviet Union New Ed by Ramet, Sabrina Petra (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : Sabrina Petra Ramet.

anti-religious campaigns The Soviet Union was the first state to have as an ideological objective the elimination of religion. Toward that end, the Communist regime confiscated church property, ridiculed religion, harassed believers, and propagated atheism in the schools. The way militant atheism worked in practice was very methodical.

Inthe Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, under Lenin, implemented a policy of separation of Church and State, which meant that all Church property (including monasteries, charitable and social works and even liturgical items) was nationalized without compensation.

According to “Soviet War News” of August 22ndthere existed at that t religious associations of all kinds in the Soviet Union. An English clergyman, Canon Widdrington, has estimated the number of supporters of the Orthodox Church alone to be s, persons.

The former Soviet Union adopted as its official religious policy atheism (and discouraged religious practice) Religion persists in regions of the former Soviet. The Anti-Religious Campaign in the Soviet Union by N. Timasheff DURING the yearsa spectacular change occurred in the anti-religious policy of the Soviet government.

The pat-tern of direct persecution was discarded and replaced by a more subtle pattern of ostentatious compromise in combination with in-direct pressure. This desire for control typifies the Soviet government’s attitude toward religious groups in the Soviet Union.

The church there is forced to choose between registering with the government and allowing a certain amount of interference in its affairs, or refusing to register and risking fines and arrests for breaking the Soviet law against.

Religion in the Soviet Union explained. The Soviet Union was established by the Bolsheviks inin place of the Russian the time of the Revolution, the Russian Orthodox Church was deeply integrated into the autocratic state, enjoying official was a significant factor that contributed to the Bolshevik attitude to religion and the steps they took to control it.

The punishment for being a Christian in the Soviet Union was just as severe as the punishment for murder. There were two groups of laws under which believers were prosecuted.

The first was for religious activity specifically, such as breaking one of the anti-religious laws. Wallace Daniel; Religious Policy in the Soviet Union. Edited by Sabrina Petra Ramet.

New York: Cambridge University Press, pp. $, Journal of ChuAuthor: Wallace Daniel. RELIGIOUS POLICY IN THE SOVIET UNION Kuroedov, a total of "new" religious congregations were "registered," while 1, congregations were "deregistered" by the authorities.

Thus, between andreligious communities were delegalized in the USSR   This book presents a comprehensive overview of religious policy in Russia since the end of the communist regime, exposing many of the ambiguities and uncertainties about the position of religion in Russian by:   According to "Soviet War News" of August 22ndthere existed at that t religious associations of all kinds in the Soviet Union.

An English clergyman, Canon Widdrington, has estimated the number of supporters of the Orthodox Church alone to be s, persons.

The Soviet government reports that religion is definitely on the decline in the USSR. And given the persistent harassment of the state, one might expect that—but trustworthy sources say it isn't : Brad Gillispie. This book does not deal with theology.

It is an attempt to provide a fuller understanding of Russian reality by drawing attention to what might be called 'the other Russia', the Russia of the believers.

I did not begin writing this book with any preconceived ideas about the strength of religion in the Soviet Union. The Soviet government's attitude to religion in theory and practice is shown in this wide-ranging collection of annotated texts from the newly-opened archives.

Included are documents from the KGB, the Central Committee, the Council for Religious Affairs and numerous other official bodies. For the. The Soviet Union was a state comprising fifteen communist republics which existed from until its dissolution into a series of separate nation states in Of these fifteen republics, six had a Muslim majority, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Kirghizia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan.

[1] There was also a large Muslim presence in the Volga-Ural region and most of the population of. For the urban workforce of the Soviet Union, Septemwas a Sunday like any other—a day of rest after six days of was the prize at the finish line: a day’s holiday.

The Communist rulers of the USSR followed the Marxist view that religion is a tool of the oppressor classes that distracts proletarians from the class struggle. Communism is a materialistic theory that stresses its “scientific” basis.

Religion the. Religion in Russia and the Soviet Union, to The Russian Orthodox Church played a major role in the history of Russia dating back centuries. It supported serfdom and monarchism. It was a source of anti-Semitism, including the fake Protocols of the Elders of Zion.

In March he spoke to the National Religious Broadcasters Association, famously terming the Soviet Union “an evil empire.” The bulk of the speech was a .